St. Louis County Courts

Episode 10 – STL County Juvenile Detention Center

St. Louis County Juvenile Detention Center
Cheryl Campbell, Director
Kellie Landaker, Assistant Director

www.stlcountycourts.com
(314)615-4400

Hear about what it’s like inside the St. Louis County Juvenile Detention Center. The Detention Center provides for the safe and secure custody of juveniles alleged to have committed an offense that brings them within the jurisdiction of the Court. These juveniles are detained only if it is believed that they present a threat to themselves or the community. They remain in detention until the Court hears their case or until appropriate alternative arrangements can be made.

The Detention Center provides for the basic needs of its residents: shelter, food, clothing and medical care. But just as importantly, the Center’s staff provides a wide range of support services intended to help promote the juvenile’s physical, social and emotional development. These services include drug and alcohol counseling, arts and crafts, mental health screening and counseling, self-help programs, educational and vocational services, fitness sessions, voluntary religious services, recreational programs and many other activities.

The Department of Health of St. Louis County provides a registered nurse, a nurse practitioner and visiting physician. The Center’s medical program is accredited through the National Commission on Correctional Health. The Episcopal City Mission provides Chaplains for the Center who, with volunteer staff, offer counseling, grief groups, enrichment programs and voluntary religious services to residents. The Court’s Family and Clinical Services Department has a staff member housed in detention five days a week and contracts for services on evenings and weekends to provide coverage seven days a week and late evening hours five days a week.

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Episode 9 – Captain Guy Means STL County Police

Captain Guy Means, Commander, 1st Precinct
St. Louis County Police Department

www.stlouiscountypolice.com

Captain Guy Means talks about his experience with the Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative and how the he and his Precinct are partnering with the St. Louis County Court.

Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative

Begun two decades ago as a pilot project to reduce reliance on local confinement of court-involved youth, the JDAI change model is now operating in nearly 300 counties nationwide, dramatically reducing detention facility populations.

Detention is a crucial early phase in the juvenile court process. Placement into a locked detention center pending court significantly increases the odds that youth will be found delinquent and committed to corrections facilities and can seriously damage their prospects for future success.
Yet many detained youth pose little or no threat to public safety.

When the Foundation launched JDAI as a pilot project in the early 1990s, overreliance on detention was widespread and growing nationwide. Using a model rooted in eight core strategies, JDAI proved effective in helping participating jurisdictions safely reduce their detention populations. Based on its success, JDAI has been adopted by an ever-growing number of jurisdictions, leading to dramatic declines in detention populations.

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Episode 8 – Metropolitan Congregations United

Metropolitan Congregations United (MCU)
Margaret Davis, Juvenile Justice Chair

www.mcustlouis.org
(314)651-7574

Metropolitan Congregations United is a community organization that brings together religious congregations, community groups, and individuals to work for a common purpose: to create a better life for all residents. The Ferguson experience continues to crystallize for us the center of our work: the intersection of race, economy, political power, gender and the structures of oppression at work within us individually, within our organizations and within the community of the St. Louis region.

MCU strives to be an organization which is the platform for faithful confrontation of the powers, conversion of systems and individuals, and expression of true community of shared self-interest. Each person’s inherent dignity is celebrated by their shared investment in building community, toward a more just and equitable region.

As an affiliate of the Gamaliel Network, we have joined our partners around the country to work towards four structural shifts.
1. Build people’s control of government
2. Build community control of the economy
3. Expand the public sphere (for example, public transportation)
4. Create structural racial equity

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Episode 7 – Father Support Center Resources

Father Support Center
Halbert Sullivan, MSW, Founder, President and CEO

www.fatherssupportcenter.org
(314)333-4170

Prince Hall Family Support Center
4411 N. Newstead, St. Louis, MO 63115

Founded in 1997, Fathers’ Support Center is dedicated to improving the lives of children and families by encouraging committed and responsible parents.

For 20 years, Fathers’ Support Center has served 15,000 fathers and their families — this includes almost 40,000 children. FSC has experienced continued success with its nationally-recognized partnerships.

Fathers’ Support Center’s rigorous, full-immersion Family Formation Program boasts a 92% job retention rate for its clients. Of the 270 fathers enrolled throughout 2017, 76% report improved or developed healthy relationships with their children. The men who completed the program in the past year are paying a combined $230,000 annually to directly support their children.

In 2017, on a $3.9 million budget in program expenses, FSC’s return on investment to the St. Louis community totaled more than $14.4 million. That’s just an initial return, and as parents, families, and communities grow stronger, the positive effect continues to multiply.

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Episode 6 – Marcia Hazelhorst – MJJA & JDAI

Marcia Hazelhorst, MJJA Executive Director and JDAI State Coordinator

www.mjja.org
www.jdaiconnect.org

Missouri Juvenile Justice Association
MJJA envisions a preferred future in which the public is aware and supportive of the delivery of quality juvenile justice services to the children of Missouri.

Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative

Begun two decades ago as a pilot project to reduce reliance on local confinement of court-involved youth, the JDAI change model is now operating in nearly 300 counties nationwide, dramatically reducing detention facility populations.

Detention is a crucial early phase in the juvenile court process. Placement into a locked detention center pending court significantly increases the odds that youth will be found delinquent and committed to corrections facilities and can seriously damage their prospects for future success.

Yet many detained youth pose little or no threat to public safety.

When the Foundation launched JDAI as a pilot project in the early 1990s, overreliance on detention was widespread and growing nationwide. Using a model rooted in eight core strategies, JDAI proved effective in helping participating jurisdictions safely reduce their detention populations. Based on its success, JDAI has been adopted by an ever-growing number of jurisdictions, leading to dramatic declines in detention populations.

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Episode 5 – The SPOT – Youth Resources

The Spot
Kelly Righton, LCSW, Director of Prevention

www.thespot.wustl.edu
(314)535-0413
4169 Laclede Avenue, St. Louis, MO 63108

Mission
Vision, Philosophy, and Guiding Principles:

Youth partnering with community for social justice and health represents the vision for The SPOT. True to this vision, The SPOT welcomes ALL youth (13-24) and responds to their particular needs through a comprehensive model of health and social services.

At the SPOT youth can
1. access health and prevention services;
2. strive for positive educational and vocational outcomes;
3. have a voice and influence in their communities through leadership opportunities.

Our philosophy requires that the SPOT be structured around the following guiding principles:
1. remove barriers that currently impede youth from seeking or obtaining health and prevention services;
2. create a center separate from a child or adult clinic environment that is youth-specific;
3. combine needed health and social services into a single setting;
4. engage youth in all aspects of the program development and allow opportunities for their leadership to be fostered;
5. successfully link youth into the existing healthcare system by addressing and eliminating specific barriers.

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Episode 4 – Man of Valor w Bishop Luther Baker

Man of Valor, Inc.
Bishop Luther Baker

www.manofvalorinc.org
(314)290-4103

To provide men and their families with the necessary resources and tools that can empower them to impact their communities and transform their lives. The more we can create positive and healthy relationships in the family. The stronger the family and community will be. The strength of the community is in the family and the strength of the family is within the father. Some things you cannot do in your own strength. There are appointed people and resources for one’s future.

There are men, families, and communities that feel stuck. Being stuck can only bring frustration, that tries to wreck the plans of one’s destiny. The frustration won’t change by wishing and no strategy. It takes planning and strategy to move families and communities forward and to bring about change. True change can only come through a renewed mind and a total change of heart. For out of the heart of a man flows the issues of life.

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Episode 3 – Gail D. Mumford, JDAI

Gail D. Mumford, Juvenile Justice Strategy Senior Associate
Annie E. Casey Foundation

www.aecf.org
Twitter: @aecfNews
Facebook: @AnnieECaseyFndn
Instagram: annieecaseyfdn
LinkedIn: annie-e.casey-foundation

The Annie E. Casey Foundation is devoted to developing a brighter future for millions of children at risk of poor educational, economic, social and health outcomes.

Our work focuses on strengthening families, building stronger communities and ensuring access to opportunity, because children need all three to succeed. We advance research and solutions to overcome the barriers to success, help communities demonstrate what works and influence decision makers to invest in strategies based on solid evidence.

As a private philanthropy based in Baltimore and working across the country, we make grants that help federal agencies, states, counties, cities and neighborhoods create more innovative, cost-effective responses to the issues that negatively affect children: poverty, unnecessary disconnection from family and communities with limited access to opportunity.

Since 1948, these efforts have translated into more informed policies and practices and yielded positive results for larger numbers of kids and families.

Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative

Begun two decades ago as a pilot project to reduce reliance on local confinement of court-involved youth, the JDAI change model is now operating in nearly 300 counties nationwide, dramatically reducing detention facility populations.

Detention is a crucial early phase in the juvenile court process. Placement into a locked detention center pending court significantly increases the odds that youth will be found delinquent and committed to corrections facilities and can seriously damage their prospects for future success.
Yet many detained youth pose little or no threat to public safety.

When the Foundation launched JDAI as a pilot project in the early 1990s, overreliance on detention was widespread and growing nationwide. Using a model rooted in eight core strategies, JDAI proved effective in helping participating jurisdictions safely reduce their detention populations. Based on its success, JDAI has been adopted by an ever-growing number of jurisdictions, leading to dramatic declines in detention populations.

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Episode 2 – Safe Connections

Safe Connections
Zenique Gardner-Perry, Prevention Education Manager
Heidi Harbin, Adolescent Clinical Manager

24-Hour Crisis Helpline
(314)531-2003

Main Office Number
(314)646-7500

2165 Hampton Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63139

www.safeconnections.org

Dani Smith, Events and Communications Manager
dani@safeconnections.org
Ext. 123

Our Mission

The mission of Safe Connections is to reduce the impact and incidence of relationship violence and sexual assault through education, crisis intervention, counseling and support services.

Agency Overview

Safe Connections is proud to be one of the St. Louis region’s oldest and largest organizations working to prevent and end domestic and sexual violence while helping survivors reclaim their lives. Our services in prevention education, crisis intervention and counseling make a big difference for families and the health of our community.

Safe Connections has grown steadily since our inception in 1976 when we began as grassroots domestic violence crisis hotline. It quickly became clear that counseling services for victims of abuse were needed, so our first mental health therapists were hired. In 1988, responding to research and our own recognition that breaking the cycle of violence must include reaching youth, we developed and introduced Project HART (Healthy Alternatives for Relationships among Teens), a violence prevention curriculum, in schools across the metropolitan area.

Safe Connections is the only domestic violence/sexual assault counseling and prevention agency in St. Louis to be accredited by the Council on Accreditation, due to our best practice standards covering governance, human resources, financial management and program services. We are also a member of the Better Business Bureaus Wise Giving Alliance and maintain a top rating with the United Way of Greater St. Louis.

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Episode 1 – NCADA Substance Abuse Treatment

NCADA
Nicole Browning, Clinical Director

www.ncada-stl.org

(314)962-3456
info@mcada-stl.org

9355 Olive Boulevard
St. Louis, MO 63132

NCADA works to reduce or prevent the harms of alcohol and other drug use through education, intervention and advocacy.

In all matters related to alcohol, tobacco, and other drug abuse, the NCADA has been the place to turn since 1965.

Substance use disorder is the leading contributor to death and injury among young people. This is unacceptable. Teenagers and young adults—with their lives full of promise and untapped potential—are too often struck down from a condition which is not only treatable, but preventable.

So one of the NCADA’s major goals is to teach young people the skills needed to resist the pressures to use and abuse drugs. We offer proven, evidence- and best-practices-based curricula for every grade from K-12 in nearly 300 schools in the region.

Additionally, we offer youth leadership programs and a wide range of non-school-based prevention services. In a normal year the NCADA offers prevention and education services to over 100,000 people.

NCADA is a proud member of the United Way, meets the 20 Better Business Bureau standards for charity accountability and was a 2013 recipient of the BBB TORCH Award for exceptional customer service and ethical business practices.

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